Novosibirsk State Pedagogical University Bulletin, 2018, No.4, pp.217-232
UDC: 
37+821.51 (=571)

Educational potential of epics and fairy tales of indigenous minority peoples of Siberia [In English]

Seredkina N. N. 1 (Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation), Smolina M. G. 1 (Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation)
1 Siberian Federal University
Abstract: 

Introduction. The formation of a positive ethnocultural identity as a possible educational effect of such teaching material as ancient epics and fairy tales of the indigenous minority peoples of Siberia. The objective of the article is to reveal the educational potential of epics and fairy tales of Siberia's minority indigenous peoples.
Materials and Methods. The authors employed the following methods: Identification and analysis of a cultural representation, comparative and typological analysis, and extrapolation.
Results. The authors have identified and clarified the educational potential of epics and fairy tales of Siberia's minority indigenous peoples, including the potential to shape a positive ethnocultural identity among readers.
Conclusions. The educational potential of epics and fairy tales of Siberia's minority indigenous peoples comprise learning the fundamentals of a culture with a traditional economy, shaping a positive ethnocultural identity among listeners and readers, as well as their ecological awareness, and developing the ability to make philosophical generalizations.

Keywords: 

Educational possibilities; Epics; Fairy tales; Indigenous minority people; Siberia; Ethnocultural identity

References: 
  1. Conacher J. E. Transformation and education in GDR youth literature: A script theory approach. International Research in Children's Literature, 2016, vol. 9, issue 1, pp. 65–82. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/ircl.2016.0183
  2. Chu Y. The power of knowledge: a critical analysis of the depiction of ethnic minorities in China’s elementary textbooks. Race Ethnicity and Education, 2015, vol. 18, issue 4, pp. 469–487. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13613324.2015.1013460
  3. Del Rosario Neira-Piñeiro M. Children as implied readers in poetry picturebooks: The adaptation of adult poetry for young readers. International Research in Children's Literature, 2016, vol. 9, issue 1, pp. 1–19. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/ircl.2016.0179
  4. Grose T. Uyghur Language Textbooks: Competing Images of a Multi-Ethnic China. Asian Studies Review, 2012, vol. 36, issue 3, pp. 369–389. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10357823.2012.711809
  5. Hope J. “The soldiers came to the house”: young children’s responses to the Colour of Home. Children's Literature in Education, 2016, pp. 1–21. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10583-016-9300-8
  6. Karlova O. A. Great Storytellers of the World About the Soul Journey in the Universe. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2017, vol. 10, issue 5, pp. 701–717. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-0077
  7. Kolesnik M. A. Decoration of Children's Literature of the Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and The Far East. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, vol. 9, issue 9, pp. 2044–2059. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-2016-9-9-2044-2059  
  8. Libakova N. M., Petrova K. I. The Children's Literature of Indigenous Small-Numbered Peoples of the Krasnoyarsk Krai. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, vol. 9, issue 9, pp. 1977–1993. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-2016-9-9-1977-1993  
  9. Luzan V. S. Soviet and Post-Soviet Periods in the History of Children's Literature in the Languages of the Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, vol. 9, issue 9, pp. 2060–2070. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-2016-9-9-2060-2070
  10. Martin R. J., Mead P., Trigger D. The politics of indigeneity, identity and representation in literature from north Australia’s Gulf Country. Social Identities, 2014, vol. 20, issue 4-5, pp. 330–345. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13504630.2014.997201
  11. Muñoz-Chereau B. Representations of dictatorship in contemporary Chilean children’s literature. Children's Literature in Education, 2017, pp. 1–13. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10583-016-9297-z
  12. Nepomniashchikh N. A., Poltoratsky I. S. Themes and motifs of newly created written literatures of Siberia: the question of the comparative study and typology. Siberian Philological Journal, 2016, no. 3, pp. 149–156. (In Russian) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17223/18137083/56/15
  13. Nikolajeva M. Recent trends in children's literature research: Return to the body. International Research in Children's Literature, 2016, vol. 9, issue 2, pp. 132–145. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/ircl.2016.0198
  14. Nyoni T., Nyoni M. The form and content of children's poetry and games on a kaleidoscopic cultural terrain. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 2013, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 233–243. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4304/tpls.3.2.233-243
  15. Parlevliet S. Fiction for peace? Domestic identity, national othering and peace education in Dutch historical novels for children, 1914-1935. International Research in Children's Literature, 2015, vol. 8, issue 1, pp. 17–30. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3366/ircl.2015.0146
  16. Pesonen J. Anti-racist Strategies in Finnish Children's Literature: Physical Appearance and Language as Signifiers of National Belonging. Children's Literature in Education, 2013, vol. 44, issue 3, pp. 238–250. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10583-012-9186-z
  17. Rafapa L. Oral literature and the evolving Jim-goes-to-town motif: Some early Northern Sotho compared to selected post-apartheid novels written in English. Literator, 2016, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. a1251. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/lit.v37i1.1251
  18. Razumovskaya V. A. Fairy-Tales of Arctic Peoples: Unique Objects of Culture and Translation. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, vol. 9, issue 10, pp. 2475–2481. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-2016-9-10-2475-2481  
  19. Reznikova K. V., Zamaraeva Yu. S. Dolgan Children's Literature: History and Specific Features. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, vol. 9, issue 9, pp.2022–2043. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-2016-9-9-2022-2043  
  20. Reznikova K., Seredkina N., Koptseva N., Zamaraeva J. Regional specifics of social values and their impact on Central Siberian territories’ modernization (based on research of Krasnoyarsk region). Economic Annals-XXI, 2016, vol. 160, issue 7-8, pp. 92–95. (In Russian) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21003/ea.V160-18  
  21. Sertakova E. A. Nenets children's literature: the history and specificity. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, vol. 9, issue 9, pp. 2013–2021. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-2016-9-9-2013-2021
  22. Sitnikova A. A. Nganasan Children Literature: History And Specifics. Journal of Siberian Federal University. Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, vol. 9, issue 9, pp. 2005–2012. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17516/1997-1370-2016-9-9-2005-2012  
  23. Sung Y. K., Sakoi J. Stories of the Ainu: The Oldest Indigenous People in Japanese Children's Literature. Bookbird: Journal of International Children's Literature, 2017, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 4–13. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bkb.2017.0001
  24. Watson N. Justice in whose eyes? Why lawyers should read black Australian literature. Griffith Law Review, 2014, vol. 23, issue 1, pp. 44–60. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10383441.2014.944006
  25. You C. Harmony, Home and Anthropomorphism: Representation of Minority Nationalities in Contemporary Chinese Ethnic Children’s Literature. Children's Literature in Education, 2017, pp. 1–17. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10583-017-9318-6
Date of the publication 31.08.2018